Active Birth - What's New?

An update of the popular Active Birth workshop for midwives, educators and doulas

For many midwives, attending an Active Birth workshop was a turning point in the development of their concept of midwifery practise. In the years since the first workshop was held in 1985, many of the simple, non-invasive strategies practised in the workshop have been used by midwives to help women achieve normal, physiological births. Many hospitals have embraced the philosophy and approach of Active Birth: that women can give birth safely, effectively and joyfully using their own instincts and inbuilt physical capacity. Yet all is not well - the rates of intervention in childbirth are still climbing, fewer women are avoiding drugs and medical interventions during birth and midwives are becoming increasingly hamstrung and frustrated by policies, procedures and practises that undermine their professional skills and willingness to be "with women".

The time is ripe to revisit the Active Birth ideas and strategies that can make such a difference to women and midwives. We need to examine what has been achieved, what is still to be implemented and what has been rejected by the health care system. Exploring these in depth and sharing our successes and difficulties will enable new paths to open up and a fresh look at what can be achieved.

Practical strategies based on the idea of "self-help" are a key to success and many new techniques are now available, based on experimentation, lateral thinking and feedback from women and midwives. Sharing these ideas and trying these ideas will energise participants and reignite their passion for enabling normal births.

Aims:

  • To review the progress of the active birth concept in our maternity care system
  • To explore avenues for promoting these ideas in today‚Äôs cultural climate
  • To review and revise practical aspects of the active birth concept

Learner outcomes:

By the conclusion of this program, participants will have:

  • Identified the active birth strategies that have been adopted in hospitals
  • Identify those that are yet to be fully implemented
  • Developed a list of strategies for overcoming barriers to implementation
  • Explored techniques that can be used to facilitate physiological births
  • Participated in a practical session on useful support techniques for labour.

Continuing Professional Development Points

Awarded 6 CPD points by the Australian College of Midwives.

Program:

FULL PROGRAM PDF

Facilitator:

ANDREA ROBERTSON


Cost:
$240 - Includes lunch, refreshments, workshop folders and notes.
Student discounts
available

 Registration: 

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Save $40!

Workshop numbers limited.

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